8 Bells (14-2-18) in F

Location:
Churchyardside, Nantwich
Postcode (for SatNav purposes only):   CW5 5DE
OS Grid Reference:   118/SJ652523

Tower correspondent:
Mary Stanwell, 41 Welsh Row, Nantwich, CW5 5EW
Phone: 01270 628900
Email: marystanwell@waitrose.com

Sunday service ringing:
10:15 – 10:45am
5:30 – 6:00pm

Practice night:
Thursday 7:00 – 9:00pm

Methods regularly rung:
Plain Bob Doubles, Minor, Triples & Major
Grandsire Doubles & Triples
Stedman Doubles & Triples
Cambridge Minor

Tower entrance:
Access via external door at NW corner of North Transept, opposite Market Hall on Churchyardside. At top of steps, cross rooftop walkway to doorway in central tower.

Car parking:
Market Hall car park, Churchyardside, off Market Street (except on market days – Tues, Thurs, Saturday); Church Lane and The Gullet, off Hospital Street; Civic Hall car park, off Beam Street.
All are Pay & Display, but free after 6pm and on Sundays.

Toilets:
In the Church and the Parish Hall (when open).
Public toilets at rear of Market car park (open 9am to 4:30pm Mondays to Saturdays).

Online maps:
Streetmap
Googlemap

The Bells

1
John Taylor, Loughborough
1922
4-2-14
2
John Taylor, Loughborough
1922
5-0-0
3
John Taylor, Loughborough
1922
5-3-4
4
John Taylor, Loughborough
1922
6-2-0
5
Abraham Rudhall I, Gloucester
1713-14
8-0-2
6
Abraham Rudhall I, Gloucester
1713-14
9-0-4
7
Abraham Rudhall I, Gloucester
1713-14
12-1-11
8
Abraham Rudhall I, Gloucester
1713-14
14-2-18

The original Rudhall ring of six was re-hung in a new cast-iron frame, the existing trebles re-cast and two new trebles cast and installed to complete the octave in 1922-23.

The Church

The Parish Church of St. Mary Nantwich is acknowledged to be one of the finest medieval town churches, sometimes called the “Cathedral of South Cheshire”. Mostly fourteenth century construction, it is the largest such church not forming part of a monastic settlement. Built on the grand scale, it has significant features in common with the cathedrals at Lichfield, Chester, Gloucester and Wells. The fine central octagonal tower is a feature for miles around South Cheshire.
The church is built in red sandstone and is cruciform in shape. A number of changes have been made over the years, particularly a substantial 19th-century restoration by Sir George Gilbert Scott. Features of the church’s interior include the lierne- or star-vaulted ceiling of the choir, the carved stone canopies of the sedilia in the chancel, and the intricately carved wooden canopies over the choirstalls together with the 20 misericords at the back of the stalls.